The First Magnetic Car, later a Flying Saucer?

 
The People’s Car Project debuted in China last year. The Hover Car is a two-seater zero emissions vehicle that hovers above the ground using electromagnetic road networks. It has distance sensors that keep the craft from colliding with other vehicles on the road. The car will be controlled by a nice-looking joystick that, based on the video below, is quite easy to use. While Volkswagen’s Hover Car is very cool, it’s important to note that it is still a concept and that it is still a far cry from the actual “car of the future” that we want to drive, paving the entire roads of china using magnetic road networks is too costly and may not be feasible.

HTRE-3? In 1955, this program produced the successful X-39 engine, two modified General Electric J47s with heat supplied by the Heat Transfer Reactor Experiment-1 (HTRE-1).[5] The first full power test of the HTRE-1 system on nuclear power only took place in January 1956. A total of 5004 megawatt-hours of operation was completed during the test program.[6] The HTRE-1 was replaced by the HTRE-2 and eventually the HTRE-3 unit powering the two J47s. The HTRE-3 used “a flight-type shield system” and would probably have gone on to power the X-6 had that program been pursued.

 

“When mankind combines magnetic energy to control gravity, using H2O water to cool and power the next generation engine(Nuclear Fusion or Fission? We do not have the technology to even build a proper nuclear fusion device in a space craft to generate energy, how to kick start the ITER project? You want to control the sun’s energy, you must first build a gravity device so strong like a black hole to contain the sun’s energy and make sure it does not leak in a containment unit), we will not only have a “car of the future” but a machine to travel thru time and space. – Contributed by Oogle.”

The ITER project confronts numerous technically challenging issues. French Nobel laureate in physics, Pierre-Gilles de Gennes said of nuclear fusion, “We say that we will put the sun into a box. The idea is pretty. The problem is, we don’t know how to make the box.”[31]
A technical concern is that the 14 MeV neutrons produced by the fusion reactions will damage the materials from which the reactor is built.[32] Research is in progress to determine how and/or if reactor walls can be designed to last long enough to make a commercial power plant economically viable in the presence of the intense neutron bombardment. The damage is primarily caused by high energy neutrons knocking atoms out of their normal position in the crystal lattice. A related problem for a future commercial fusion power plant is that the neutron bombardment will induce radioactivity in the reactor itself.[33] Maintaining and decommissioning a commercial reactor may thus be difficult and expensive. Another problem is that superconducting magnets are damaged by neutron fluxes. A new special research facility is planned for this activity, IFMIF.
The ITER tokamak will use three interconnected cooling systems. Most of the heat will be removed by a primary water cooling loop, itself cooled by water through a heat exchanger within the tokamak building’s secondary confinement. The secondary cooling loop will be cooled by a larger complex, comprising a cooling tower, a 5 km pipeline supplying water from Canal de Provence, and basins that allow cooling water to be cooled and tested for chemical contamination and tritium before being released into the Durance River. This system will need to dissipate an average power of 450 MW during the tokamak’s operation. A liquid nitrogen system will provide a further 1300 kW of cooling to 80 Kelvin, and a liquid helium system will provide 65 kW of cooling to 4.5 Kelvin.

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