Amanda Todd is not the real target, it is me because nobody has my skills, those who screw around with my works will get no jobs and no money and end up dead

CTVNews.ca
Published Saturday, Oct. 13, 2012 2:10PM EDT

Last Updated Saturday, Oct. 13, 2012 4:08PM EDT
While RCMP investigators are trying to track down the people who may have contributed to British Columbia teenager Amanda Todd’s death, the online bullying police believe pushed her to take her own life shows no sign of letting up.
While more than 400,000 Facebook users had “liked” Todd’s memorial page on the social media website by Saturday afternoon, strangers and even former classmates interrupted the condolences to post vile comments and images.
Posts include one, by a woman who identified herself as Todd’s classmate, who wrote: “I’m so happy she’s dead now.”
Todd, 15, was found dead in her Port Coquitlam home Wednesday, following an apparent suicide after she shared her story about relentless bullying in an online video post.
The RCMP has launched an investigation into teenage girl’s death.
“We want to gather enough evidence to eventually identify an individual that may, in some way, have played a role in her ultimately making this terrible decision,” RCMP Sgt. Peter Thiessen told CTV News.
The RCMP has said scouring social media will be part of its ongoing investigation, which includes looking at the negative posts turning up online in the days since Todd’s death.
“I am finding now that young women are contacting us and are extremely upset with what they are seeing on social media sites,” Thiessen told CTV News Channel Saturday.
Thiessen said police are trying to combat online bullying but it is “extremely difficult.”
“It’s sad to have these discussions with these young girls that are reaching out,” said Thiessen.
Commenters continued to post on the social media site calling Todd names, suggesting her story was receiving too much attention. An internet meme was even created featuring Amanda’s photo and the words: “kills herself and people act like she’s a victim that did nothing wrong.”
Todd shared her story about being tormented by online bullying in a moving video she posted on YouTube in early September. Since then, the video has been watched more than 1,600,000 times.
Todd explains in her video that the trouble began when she was in Grade 7 when she used to use a webcam to go online with friends to meet new people. After being told she was beautiful she agreed to pose for topless photos on the webcam.
These photos were used over and over by her alleged tormentors.
“I can never get that photo back, it’s out there forever,” she says in the video.
The same images have resurfaced on the Facebook memorial pages dedicated to the teen, with one individual even adding “laugh out loud, end the search.”
RCMP will continue its investigations and will be conducting interviews, scouring social media and reviewing contributing factors into Todd’s death. Police have also set up an email account AmandaTODDinfo@rcmp-grc.gc.ca for the public to email tips on the case.
Theissen said the response so far has been “significant,” and hopes to have a number out later today.
“It has been a wide range of tips, many providing us with inappropriate comments and photos that are being posted. A wide variety of information that all put together will hopefully help us gather the evidence in a very complex investigation,” said Theissen.
Invesitgators have already said bullying could have played a role in the teen’s death.
Potential criminal charges could be laid against the individuals who tormented Todd, said Thiessen, but noted it was too early to speculate what area of the criminal code this would fall under.
Amanda’s mother, Carol, broke her silence Friday in hopes that her daughter’s video is a legacy to others as well as a teaching tool.
“She wanted people to know if you’re being bullied that you have to share it with others and tell someone, otherwise it becomes invisible and nobody knows. She didn’t want anyone to feel the pain that she felt,” Carol told CTV British Columbia.
Carol is setting up an anti-bullying trust fund in the hopes the suffering will finally stop. British Columbians are also being asked to wear pink or blue on Monday in honour of Amanda.
“She had the biggest heart,” said Carol.
British Columbia Premier Christy Clark is calling for change, hoping to make cyberbullying a criminal offence. As it stands, no laws specifically addressing cyberbullying exist in Canada.
The Maple Ridge School district said that there have been “significant and appropriate consequences” dealt out to Amanda’s bullies. But the school district has not released what these consequences were.
Coroner Barb McLintock said the investigation will be complex and comprehensive. McLintock added the investigation will look into everything from the school and mental health supports that were offered to Todd, and the effects that social media bullying and blackmail put on Amanda.
—————————————————————–
My family members have brainwashed everybody telling everybody garbage like I am Jesus so that they can get benefits, but when they found out I already know all their secrets, they get more than 10,000 people to attack me and whatever I say on my websites because they are all very rich from the money they swindled from others, eventually telling others I will give up everything and sacrifice my own life, trying to kill me, but they forgot, I am the second in command and I will overturn everything even if the entire world go against me, you dare to challenge my works and God’s destiny? All will end up with no money, no jobs and dead.
– Contributed by Oogle. 

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