Wrong set of rules used for planning, you cannot leave to chance

Kuala Lumpur International Airport (KLIA) (IATA: KUL, ICAO: WMKK) is Malaysia’s main international airport and is also one of the major airports of South East Asia, giving it huge, even multinational, catchment area. It is about 80 kilometres (50 mi) from Malaysia’s capital, Kuala Lumpur. The airport is in the Sepang district of southern Selangor state. KLIA’s construction cost RM8.5 billion or US$3.5 billion.[1]

The airport can currently handle 35 million passengers and 1.2 million tonnes of cargo a year. In 2010, it handled 34,087,636 passengers; in 2011 it handled 669,849 metric tonnes of cargo. It was ranked the 14th busiest airport in the world by international passenger traffic, and is the 5th busiest international airport in Asia. It was ranked the 29th busiest airport by cargo traffic in 2010.[2] The Bernama News Agency reported a modest growth in traffic in the first six months of 2011, with an almost 13% increase from 16.2 million to 18.3 million passengers.

The airport is operated by Malaysia Airports (MAHB) Sepang Sdn Bhd and is the major hub of Malaysia Airlines, MASkargo, AirAsia, AirAsia X and Department of Civil Aviation (DCA)

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You need to have very detailed data where your markets is, the top five destinations that will use your KLIA facilities, then plan your facilities to meet the demand, not the other way round, or you will make so many mistakes that things will not link up, not connect properly. Land and building costs is cheap in Malaysia, you can built a large airport but if you do not get things right nobody will use your facilities because you target the wrong audience, that is the reason you will not make money, if you readjust, you could concentrate on what is the facilities that drive your bottom line, and put your money you save to better gain your tourism marketshare, having a lot of flights without an idea where your market is will never create traffic, neither will you gain the tourism dollar.

– Contributed by Oogle.

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