Why certain portions of the Mekong River faces poor harvest of fishery

The Mekong River is the world’s tenth largest river and Asia’s seventh biggest river which stretches from the Tibetan Plateau through China’s Yunnan province before passing through Burma, Laos, Thailand, Cambodia and Vietnam.The Mekong River has an estimated length of 4,909 km’s, draining an area of 795,000 square km’s.

Mekong River ThailandThe mighty Mekong River rises in ‘The Three Rivers’ area on the Tibetan Plateau together with the Yangtze and Salween Rivers before flowing south west through China. The Mekong River then changes in a south easterly direction briefly forming the border between Burma and Laos before once again winding its way in a south westerly route where it forms the border between Thailand and Laos.

The Mekong River then changes course once again stretching 400km’s into Laos passing through Vientiane before once again redefining the Laos-Thailand border for almost 850 km’s.
 
The Mekong River in Thailand continues to wind its way right through Northern Thailand before reaching Cambodia where it receives the Sap River before flowing into the Tonle Sap Lake system and then passing through the Cambodian capital of Phnom Penh.
 
As the Mekong River continues its winding path into Vietnam the rivers pace begins to slow as it divides into nine separate channels known as the Mekong Delta before ending its epic journey in the South China Sea.
 
The Mekong River is annually influenced by extreme seasonal variations of flow and is extremely hard to navigate due to various rapids and waterfalls throughout its entire length.
 
Navigation of the Mekong River is further hindered by its flow taking it through the infamous Golden Triangle region in addition to several disputed areas in Burma- Laos.
 
The Mekong River is an extremely rich aquatic environment which is believed to hold over 1,300 different species of fish with at least 600 being migratory species.
 
The Mekong River is an important resource for all of the inhabitants of the Mekong Basin providing a large portion of the local inhabitant’s staple diet in addition to providing water, irrigation, transport and energy.
 
The Mekong River in Thailand is one of the most biologically diverse environments in the world and is home to numerous species of flora, fauna and animals endemic to the Mekong River Basin.
 
The Mekong River is joined by several other great rivers of Thailand which include the Ing River, Ruak River and Mun River which in turn is joined by the Chi River, Dom Noi River and Lam Ta Klong Rivers.
 
The Mekong River in Thailand is home to several of the largest freshwater fish species in the world such as the mythical Mekong CatfishChaophraya Catfish (Dog eating Catfish) and Giant freshwater stingray and various other River Monsters.
Due to the building of dams for hydro-electricity, the entire eco-system of the river has been disrupted, what is open now becomes closed into many sub-ecosystem, and the only way to solve this problem is to cultivate the normal fishery by growing young species of fishs and put back what is taken away instead of overfishing which will kill the ecosystem. Samples of water can be taken at different sections of the river to determine the oxygen levels and planktons or organisms that is found in the upstream and downstream of the river. What is lacking you need to supplement to create an ideal environment for breeding. It is no use to pray to Gods without trying to solve the problems yourselves since mankind first cause the problem. In this way, the problems of overfishing can easily be solved.
– Contributed by Oogle.
 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s